The horse skeleton its important to horse owners

The Horse Skeleton & how your horse is put together

The horses skeleton provides support for its muscles; protection for the horse’s internal organs; and has enough mobility built into its various parts that the horse can move smoothly at differing speeds and still lie down, graze or do both at the same time.

Horse laminitis - Causes & Treatment

What is horse laminitis? How do you prevent or treat it?

The first sign of laminitic symptoms from a dietary cause will usually appear within 24 to 48 hrs. The horse may adopt the classic horse laminitis stance, with its hind feet placed up under its belly. Laminitis can be a very serious equine condition and all horse owners should be aware of the signs causes & treatment of horse laminitis

What are Equine Sarcoids & How to treat horse sarcoids

Treating Equine Sarcoids no half measures recommended ...

Horse sarcoids are notoriously difficult to treat and various treatment options are available. Most however are dependent on the type and location of the sarcoid. Options range from do nothing to Surgical Excision, Cryosurgery, Electrocautery, Hyperthermia and even Chemotherapy …

Horse Strangles - Streptococcus equi

Prevent Equine Strangles on your livery yard or riding school

Several common sense measures can be taken to prevent strangles affecting horses at a livery yard or riding school. Prevention is better than cure and horse owners themselves should always be aware of strangles outbreaks in their area. You are responsible for your horse’s welfare and you should insist your livery yard or riding school take preventive measures

Equine Laminitis Signs & Symptoms

Laminitis Symptoms and the signs to look out for ...

Equine laminitis doesn’t just affect fat ponies, it can be found in any horse prone to the condition. Spotting laminitis symptoms and knowing the difference between chronic laminitis and acute laminitis is important as by the time your horse adopts the classical laminitis stance, some damage has already been done to the sensitive laminae …

Ragwort and Horse - A Poisonous Plant Toxic to Horses

Ragwort - A Poisonous Plant Toxic to Horses

Ragwort and Horses make for a poisonous combination. Most horse will avoid ragwort as long as they have access to good grazing but overgrazed or poached pasture not only keeps your horse hungry it also encourages the spread of ragwort. So, how do you deal with this poisonous plant that’s so toxic to horses?

Horse Sarcoids Causes

What Causes Horse Sarcoids

A UK vet has quite possibly linked common face flies to the spread of sarcoids, but it is commonly thought that a papilloma virus (wart) is probably what causes horse sarcoids

What to do if you think your horse has colic?

Stay calm and try to walk your horse and distract him from the pain when he’s trying to roll or thrash about. Your vet is your best source of treatment for horse colic and your job is to assist your horse and make it as comfortable as possible until you can have your vet treat your horse. There are some things you can do but mainly you should trust your vet to help your horse

How to Treat Laminitis in your Horse or Pony

Laminitis is really a nutritional problem and it is possible to help your horse a lot by using nutritional supplements. Managing feeds properly and incorporating a liver tonic can help improve equine digestion. A good quality liver tonic will support the way the body deals with toxins that are circulating around the body

Equine Navicular in Horses

Navicular in Horses; A common source of lameness

Equine Navicular syndrome also known as Caudal Heel Syndrome is a serious problem with horse hooves and can badly affect a horses performance. If your horses hooves are not properly cared for the navicular bone can become immobile, which can result in poor blood flow within the hoof and ultimately, permanent lameness …

Horse Strangles - Streptococcus equi

Horse Strangles, Symptoms Cause & Treatment

Equine or horse strangles is one of the most infectious equine diseases, the bacterium enters the horses lymph glands via its respiratory tract and can live in the guttural pouch. The lymph nodes swell and can rupture, shedding the strangles bacteria into the environment. It’s possible the strangles bacteria can survive in water for at least four weeks and for up to eight weeks on horse tack and wooden fencing.